Vicente Rafael

Motherless Tongues: The Insurgency of Language amid Wars of Translation

Motherless Tongues: The Insurgency of Language amid Wars of Translation

978-0-8223-6074-2_prAuthor(s): Vicente  L. Rafael Published: 2016, Duke University Press Cloth: $89.95 - 978-0-8223-6058-2 Paperback: $24.95 - 978-0-8223-6074-2

Description

In Motherless Tongues, Vicente L. Rafael examines the vexed relationship between language and history gleaned from the workings of translation in the Philippines, the United States, and beyond. Moving across a range of colonial and postcolonial settings, he demonstrates translation's agency in the making and understanding of events. These include nationalist efforts to vernacularize politics, U.S. projects to weaponize languages in wartime, and autobiographical attempts by area studies scholars to translate the otherness of their lives amid the Cold War. In all cases, translation is at war with itself, generating divergent effects. It deploys as well as distorts American English in counterinsurgency and colonial education, for example, just as it re-articulates European notions of sovereignty among Filipino revolutionaries in the nineteenth century and spurs the circulation of text messages in a civilian-driven coup in the twenty-first. Along the way, Rafael delineates the untranslatable that inheres in every act of translation, asking about the politics and ethics of uneven linguistic and semiotic exchanges. Mapping those moments where translation and historical imagination give rise to one another, Motherless Tongues shows how translation, in unleashing the insurgency of language, simultaneously sustains and subverts regimes of knowledge and relations of power. Vicente L. Rafael is Professor of History at the University of Washington. His books include The Promise of the ForeignWhite Love and Other Events in Filipino History, and Contracting Colonialism, all also published by Duke University Press.

The War of Translation: Colonial Education, American English, and Tagalog Slang in the Philippines

The War of Translation: Colonial Education, American English, and Tagalog Slang in the Philippines

Vicente L. Rafael The Journal of Asian Studies / FirstView Article / March 2015, pp 1 - 20 DOI: 10.1017/S0021911814002241, Published online: 24 March 2015 This paper examines the role of language in nationalist attempts at decolonization. In the case of the Philippines, American colonial education imposed English as the sole medium of instruction. Native students were required to suppress their vernacular languages so that the classroom became the site for a kind of linguistic war, or better yet, the war of translation.
The Only Thing Worth Globalizing Is Dissent: Translation and the Many Languages of Resistance

The Only Thing Worth Globalizing Is Dissent: Translation and the Many Languages of Resistance

A three-day conference to be held in Cairo, 6-8 March 2015 Funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council, UK Organized by Mona Baker, Yasmin El Rifae, and Mada Masr http://globalizingdissent.wordpress.com Activists from various regions and countries connect with and influence one another through practices involving various types of translation, including video subtitling, written translation, and oral interpretation. The Egyptian Revolution and the activists and collectives who have worked to move it forward have been highly visible to other protest movements in large part through such practices.