Translating Dissent

Life after the Squares: Reflections on the consequences of the Occupy movements

Life after the Squares: Reflections on the consequences of the Occupy movements

Social Movement Studies  Volume 16, 2017 - Issue 1: Special Issue: Resisting Austerity: Collective Action in Europe in the Wake of the Global Financial Crisis Editors: Cristina Flesher Fominaya & Graeme Hayes This section: Edited by Amador Fernández-Savater, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, With contributions by Luhuna Carvalho, Çiğdem, Hoda Elsadda, Wiam El-Tamami, Patricia Horrillo, Silvia Nanclares & Stavros Stavrides Pages 119-151  Abstract This is a roundtable with reflections on Tahrir Square, Egypt; Syntagma Square, Greece; Rossio Square, Portugal; 15-M Puerta del Sol, Spain; Gezi Park, Turkey; and Occupy Wall Street, USA.
Paradoxical truths of an isolationist empire

Paradoxical truths of an isolationist empire

Omar Robert Hamilton Mada Masr, November 17, 2016 In the photograph, I’m wearing a gas mask and 3D glasses that I knew, if it came down to it, would not protect my eyes from the police’s buckshot. My mother is next to me, we’re riding the elevator in her building, going down to Tahrir. The police had attacked a protest and, back then, when the police attacked — everyone went out to fight.
Khalid Abdalla: 'I didn't have the right to play Arab roles unless I had lived the struggle'

Khalid Abdalla: 'I didn't have the right to play Arab roles unless I had lived the struggle'

The situation in Egypt right now is horrendous’ … Khalid Abdalla Photograph: David Degner The Kite Runner actor is also an activist involved in documenting Egypt’s uprising and subsequent collapse. So why has the Cairo premiere of his new film been called off? For Khalid Abdalla, the boundary between life and art has repeatedly blurred and shifted over the past six years. The actor, best known for his roles in films such as The Kite Runner and Green Zone, has portrayed a film-maker struggling to finish a documentary in the tense political climate of pre-revolutionary Cairo, starred in a documentary about the 2011 revolution, actually documented the same uprising and its troubled aftermath, and set up a film centre in the Egyptian capital to support independent film-makers.
Swimming Backwards

Swimming Backwards

Khalid Abdalla 31 October 2016 My father isn't dead yet, but he almost died twice. Illness brought us to the very edge of the precipice and both times his loosening grip sent stones of harrowing sizes tumbling, but the avalanche of grief has so far remained in place, alert. Still, walking on the fault line I have come close enough to know that with the approach of death comes an intensity of stories.
Epilogue: Moments of Clarity

Epilogue: Moments of Clarity

Omar Robert Hamilton Omar Robert Hamilton is a filmmaker, writer and cultural organizer working in documentary and fiction. He helped found Cairo's Mosireen collective and works on the documentation, archiving and the visual record of the Egyptian revolution in various ways: after making dozens of short documentaries he’s currently editing a feature documentary from the archive. He helped found the annual Palestine Festival of Literature, which seeks to challenge Israel's various apartheid policies and the international discourse surrounding them.
Faber signs remarkable debut: The City Always Wins

Faber signs remarkable debut: The City Always Wins

Faber | 13 April 2016 Faber signs a remarkable debut The City Always Wins amidst major rights excitement at the London Book Fair Faber is delighted to announce an extraordinary and important first novel by Omar Robert Hamilton. David Godwin sold Lee Brackstone World Rights excluding US. The novel is scheduled for publication in Spring 2017. The City Always Wins is a remarkable novel from the psychological heart of a revolution.
Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project

In 2016 Bahia Shehab started an international street campaign celebrating the work of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. The first intervention was in Vancouver-Canada. In February she sprayed the stanza “Stand at the corner of a dream and fight” in downtown Vancouver. Street expression is no longer tolerated in Cairo. Shehab finds that the work of Darwish is more relevant today with the current political atmosphere in most of the Arab world.
Democratic Walls? Street Art as Public Pedagogy

Democratic Walls? Street Art as Public Pedagogy

John Johnston This chapter explores the potential of street art as a means of gaining voice and political capital, and the connections between Egyptian and other traditions of street art. Constructing an argument for artists to see their role as that of public educator, it highlights a major concern for street art in contested spaces, namely, the danger of falling into what Freire (1970) describes as a ‘banking pedagogy’, where the values are drawn from a limited source and deposited onto a community without consultation or inclusion.
The prefigurative politics of translation in place-based movements of protest

The prefigurative politics of translation in place-based movements of protest

Subtitling in the Egyptian Revolution DOI: 10.1080/13556509.2016.1148438 (link to prepublication version at end of post)Mona Baker, The Translator, Volume 22, Number 1, 2016, pages 1-21 Abstract The idea of prefiguration is widely assumed to derive from anarchist discourse; it involves experimenting with currently available means in such a way that they come to mirror or actualise the political ideals that inform a movement, thus collapsing the traditional distinction between means and ends.
Beyond the Spectacle: Translation and Solidarity in Contemporary Protest Movements

Beyond the Spectacle: Translation and Solidarity in Contemporary Protest Movements

Mona Baker This chapter maps out the space of translation within the political economy of contemporary protest movements, using the Egyptian Revolution as a case in point and extending the definition of translation to cover a range of modalities and types of interaction. It identifies themes and questions that arise out of the concrete experiences of activists mobilizing and reflecting on what it means to work for justice, both within and across borders, and to attempt to effect change at home while conversing with others who are fighting similar battles elsewhere.