Street Art

Cairo as Canvas

Cairo as Canvas

By Bahia Shehab, Citysharing The streets of Cairo have become an open gallery to many artists wishing to express their views, dreams and hopes for a better Egypt. Artists are using the walls of the city to tell their stories, to lament the death of martyrs and to call for political and social change. Thus each painted wall acquires a life of its own, it no longer belongs to a building, a bridge or a street, but it has been recruited to serve a cause and to rally a group of people to support that cause.
Bahia Shehab: A thousand times no

Bahia Shehab: A thousand times no

Filmed June 2012 Subtitles available in 36 languages Art historian Bahia Shehab has long been fascinated with the Arabic script for ‘no.’ When revolution swept through Egypt in 2011, she began spraying the image in the streets saying no to dictators, no to military rule and no to violence. Interactive transcriptInteractive transcript TED Fellow Bahia Shehab sends an important message through her street art in Cairo: “You can crush the flowers, but you can’t delay spring.

Global Street Art Episode 1 - Egypt - Cairo SprayCan Rebels - Art in the Streets - MOCAtv

Published on Mar 22, 2013 Egypt's January 25 revolution helped bring out the best in raw and potent urban arts, most of all in the graffiti scene in Cairo. This short video gives a brief glimpse into the always evolving street art scene that has gone from strength to strength and become a valuable component in the creative resistance to Egyptian authorities and establishment. Produced by: Soraya Morayef Directed and Edited by: Marwan Imam Music by: Ahmed Safi Footage courtesy of: Islam Momtaz Soraya Morayef Amir Nazeer Farah Saafan Ian Lee Rodina Mikhail Carmel Alyaa Delshad Featuring the works of: The Sad Panda Kareem Gouda Ganzeer Charles Akl Amr Gamal Ammar Abo Bakr Mohamed El Moshir Laila Magued Alaa Awad Zeft Amr Nazeer Hozny Iyad Oraby Aref and Hoda Ismail Ahmed El Masry Saiko Manio Ahmed Abdallah KIM Shaza Khaled Alia El Tayeb El Teneen Hossam Shukrallah Ziad Tarek Mariam Abou Ghazi Youssef Bagato Saif Roshdy Mostafa el Tourkhy And many others who remain anonymous
Here Today: Soraya Morayef & Egyptian Street Art

Here Today: Soraya Morayef & Egyptian Street Art

Mural by Alaa Awad Africaseen blog, 2nd April 2013 by Susan Phillips While Soraya Morayef identifies herself as a writer and journalist, I see her through a different lens, as an artist and archivist. Through her photo blog documenting the extraordinary explosion of street art in Egypt following the initial Tahrir Square protests of January 2011, Morayef has captured, framed, and contextualized a fleeting moment in Egypt's long, proud history of artistic and cultural expression.
Egyptian Graffiti and Gender Politics: An Interview with Soraya Morayef

Egyptian Graffiti and Gender Politics: An Interview with Soraya Morayef

Sit El Banat, stencil tribute to the women who were beaten, dragged and stamped on by military forces in December 2011. Copyright Suzee in the City. 28 March 2013, africaisacountry.com Mickey Mouse is pulling apart a bomb: inside is the torso of George W. Bush, and they’re both looking perfectly happy about the whole thing. Soraya Morayef is taking a photo of the wall where these figures are painted, on a busy street in downtown Cairo, when a man walks up to her and asks her what the picture means.
Angels caught in a tightening noose

Angels caught in a tightening noose

By Soraya Morayef Open Democracy, 13 November 2013 Many disregard the recurrent stories of prison deaths, police torture and rape because - on the other hand – Egypt's streets are empty after curfew and the walls are freshly painted; surely a clear indication that the state has succeeded in restoring security and defeating terrorism. On Tuesday November 5, Egypt’s Minister of Local Development, Adel Labib, announced a new law criminalizing graffiti with a maximum jail sentence of four years and a fine of 100,000LE.
The Seven Wonders of the Revolution

The Seven Wonders of the Revolution

[A mural on Sheikh Rihan Street's wall. Image from the author.]By Soraya Morayef Jadaliyya, 22 May 2012 Around the corner from Tahrir Square, the heart of Egypt’s eighteen-day uprising, Mohamed Mahmud Street bears the scars of a turbulent political year in Egypt. The once-bustling street off of Tahrir Square has seen its share of violent battlefields--beginning with 28 January 2011 and ending with the February 2012 clashes following the Port Said massacre.
NEFERTITI'S DAUGHTERS (Sneak Preview #1)

NEFERTITI'S DAUGHTERS (Sneak Preview #1)

Preview of Mark Nickolas documentary film Nefertiti's Daughters, featuring some of the most interesting street artists in Egypt. LOG LINE: Queen Nefertiti returns to join revolutionary street artists on the front lines in the fight for women’s rights and freedom in Egypt. SYNOPSIS: Nefertiti’s Daughters is a story of women, art and revolution. Told by prominent Egyptian artists, this documentary witnesses the critical role revolutionary street art played during the Egyptian uprisings.
Update: Egypt confiscates revolution-time graffiti book for “instigating revolt”

Update: Egypt confiscates revolution-time graffiti book for “instigating revolt”

Egypt Independent Mohamed Mostafa Egypt's customs services in Alexandria have seized 400 copies of "Walls of Freedom", a book depicting Egypt's street graffitti art in the context of the 2011 uprising, for “instigating revolt,” says the Finance Ministry. Ahmed al-Sayyad, the ministry’s undersecretary, told Al-Masry Al-Youm that the book contains elements that give "advice on confronting police and army forces,” therefore a cause for concern.
Is Cairene Graffiti Losing Momentum?

Is Cairene Graffiti Losing Momentum?

[Late graffiti artist Hisham Rizq, killed in July 2014, painted by Ammar Abu Bakr. Captured 12 September 2014]By Mona Abaza, 25 January 2015 Clearly Cairene graffiti has lost momentum during this year. Having been the faithful barometer of the revolution over the past three years, graffiti has recently faced transmutations and drawbacks that run parallel with the political process of restoring “order” in the street. The heartbreaking story of the recent death of a cheerful and bright young graffiti artist, nineteen-year-old Hisham Rizq, completes this sad picture.