Street Art

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project II

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project II

More Walls Painted In 2016 Bahia Shehab started an international street campaign celebrating the work of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. The first intervention was in Vancouver-Canada. In February she sprayed the stanza “Stand at the corner of a dream and fight” in downtown Vancouver. Street expression is no longer tolerated in Cairo. Shehab finds that the work of Darwish is more relevant today with the current political atmosphere in most of the Arab World.
Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project

In 2016 Bahia Shehab started an international street campaign celebrating the work of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. The first intervention was in Vancouver-Canada. In February she sprayed the stanza “Stand at the corner of a dream and fight” in downtown Vancouver. Street expression is no longer tolerated in Cairo. Shehab finds that the work of Darwish is more relevant today with the current political atmosphere in most of the Arab world.
Writing’s on the wall: How street art creates learning spaces

Writing’s on the wall: How street art creates learning spaces

Written by Tom Morgan Published on 25 Jan 2016, Goldsmiths University of London Website Street art can be used to help establish a public space for teaching and learning, according to a Goldsmiths academic John Johnston, Head of the MA Artist Teachers and Contemporary Practices in the Department of Educational Studies, has contributed a chapter to the award-winning book Translating Dissent: Voices from and with the Egyptian Revolution.
'Erase and I will draw again'

'Erase and I will draw again'

Egyptians walk past graffiti with modern and pharaonic motifs in Mohammed Mahmoud Street near Tahrir Square, Cairo in 2014. The famous wall is being systematically knocked down. Photograph: Hassan Ammar/AP The struggle behind Cairo's revolutionary graffiti wall The graffiti murals that sprang up on the walls of Cairo were a spontaneous reaction to Egypt’s revolution. But, despite their cultural importance, they’re being demolished in an attempt to clean up the city .
Exploring Genocide: educational challenges and opportunities

Exploring Genocide: educational challenges and opportunities

DevelopmentEducation.ie Action Projects AUTHOR DETAILS Colm Regan 80:20 Educating and Acting for a Better World - www.8020.ie The mural was co-ordinated by John Johnston of 80:20 (now with Goldsmith’s College, London) and Valarie Duffy (now with the National Youth Council of Ireland). PARTICIPANTS Young people 14+; over 9 schools and two youth organisations from East Belfast and the Republic of Ireland Phase 1 of the project was led by Alternatives in East Belfast and Presentation College, Bray, Co.
Deptford student mural tells police: things must change

Deptford student mural tells police: things must change

‘I Am Here’ mural detail. Pic: Laura Liszewski EAST LONDON LINES December 3, 2012 | Posted by: Laura Liszewski |  Three scenes stand side by side, occupying a vibrantly painted mural. On the far left, a menacing officer’s mouth opens wide to expose a prisoner behind bars, on the far right hooded youths stand, pressed against walls and try to reach through blue chains, while in the middle of it all a peaceful man tends delicate flowers as white doves fly towards a yellow rising sun.

Visual Identity

Published on May 21, 2013 Reviving calligraphy and shaping the future of script through her students, Bahia Shehab, Associate Professor of Practice in the Department of the Arts, works on the first ever encyclopedia of the Arabic script.
Blue Bra Graffiti (Bahia Shehab)

Blue Bra Graffiti (Bahia Shehab)

No to Stripping BY Nama Khalil 2 September 2014, Design and Violence From the curators: Using sexual violence to intimidate, crack down on dissent, or brutalize opposition is nothing new. Neither is graffiti—illicit drawings are older than Pompeii. However, such designs have taken on new life of late, paralleling an increased public and political focus on female sexuality. During the wave of disparate yet interconnected protests that made up the Arab Spring (2010–ongoing), graffiti emerged as an untamable form of grassroots resistance to such violence.

Bahia Shehab: Art As a Tool for Change

https://vimeo.com/89910610 24 March 2014, Louisiana Channel "Graffiti is like flowers. They are beautiful, but they don't live long." An interview with Lebanese-Egyptian street-artist Bahia Shehab about the role of art during the Arab spring: "You cannot resist ideas. They can travel into any mind." "I am a quiet person, I don't know how to scream", says Bahia Shehab. "My contribution to the revolution was to paint on the walls, was to be an artist.
A thousand times NO: Fellows Friday with Bahia Shehab

A thousand times NO: Fellows Friday with Bahia Shehab

Posted by: Karen Eng September 7, 2012 TED Blog When art historian and scholar of Arabic script Bahia Shehab was asked to create a piece commemorating the centenary of the first exhibition on Islamic art in Europe, little did she know that the Egyptian revolution would ultimately transform her into a street artist and activist with a powerful and subtle voice of protest. How did your work with the character for “no” begin?