Sherief Gaber

What Word Is This Place? Translating Urban Social Justice and Governance

What Word Is This Place? Translating Urban Social Justice and Governance

Sherief Gaber Alongside the political transformations that Egypt has witnessed since 2011, there has been a concomitant transformation within Egyptian cities and a wealth of civil society initiatives seeking social justice in the urban environment. Architectural and planning practices, local NGOs and rights groups have sought new languages and new terminology to deal with the phenomena on the ground and to intervene in shaping the new landscape. Issues of language arise particularly clearly in attempts to translate new concepts in urbanism into Arabic, concepts such as the right to the city, participatory planning and budgeting, and various descriptions of public space and rights to access.
Egypt - A View from the Revolution

Egypt - A View from the Revolution

Sherief Gaber As Interviewed by Elizah Flores, March 30, 2011 Whatever connection I had with Egypt was just screaming at me that I had to go. Introductory Profile: About Sherief Gaber Sherief Gaber is a twenty-six year-old graduate student at the University of Texas studying law and urban planning. He grew up in Memphis and went to college in Saint Louis. His parents came to America from Egypt shortly before he was born.
Egypt - A View from the Revolution

Egypt - A View from the Revolution

Sherief Gaber As Interviewed by Elizah Flores, March 30, 2011 Whatever connection I had with Egypt was just screaming at me that I had to go. Introductory Profile: About Sherief Gaber Sherief Gaber is a twenty-six year-old graduate student at the University of Texas studying law and urban planning. He grew up in Memphis and went to college in Saint Louis. His parents came to America from Egypt shortly before he was born.
The Daily Texan

The Daily Texan

Published on February 28, 2011 at 12:00 am By Allie Kolechta A UT graduate student stood with protesters in downtown Cairo as they barricaded themselves against military attacks and fought for a revolution in the midst of former President Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. Law and urban planning graduate student Sherief Gaber flew straight into Cairo on Jan. 30 to join the protests in Tahrir Square before Mubarak stepped down from the Egyptian presidency.
The Daily Texan

The Daily Texan

Published on February 28, 2011 at 12:00 am By Allie Kolechta A UT graduate student stood with protesters in downtown Cairo as they barricaded themselves against military attacks and fought for a revolution in the midst of former President Hosni Mubarak’s resignation. Law and urban planning graduate student Sherief Gaber flew straight into Cairo on Jan. 30 to join the protests in Tahrir Square before Mubarak stepped down from the Egyptian presidency.
Deaths without dignity

Deaths without dignity

21 August 2013, Mada Masr By Sherief Gaber "You want to see the bodies? Ok then, here!" the man working at the morgue said, holding me and a friend by the arm and practically pushing us into a humid room filled with bodies, lying on slabs or on the floor and in various states of decay. We had been at the morgue for over an hour, coming from the tear gas and shooting in Mohamed Mahmoud Street to Zeinhom, Cairo's only morgue, because we had heard that medical examiners were refusing to autopsy the bodies of those shot by the police and military in the clashes.
Deaths without dignity

Deaths without dignity

21 August 2013, Mada Masr By Sherief Gaber "You want to see the bodies? Ok then, here!" the man working at the morgue said, holding me and a friend by the arm and practically pushing us into a humid room filled with bodies, lying on slabs or on the floor and in various states of decay. We had been at the morgue for over an hour, coming from the tear gas and shooting in Mohamed Mahmoud Street to Zeinhom, Cairo's only morgue, because we had heard that medical examiners were refusing to autopsy the bodies of those shot by the police and military in the clashes.
Maspero and memory

Maspero and memory

09-10-2013, Mada Masr By Sherief Gaber Two years ago today, just after sunset, the Egyptian army murdered 28 people in the span of perhaps fifteen minutes. Many were shot, several were run over by armored vehicles zigzagging up and down the Corniche, and all this took just fifteen minutes. Bodies were carried into the lobby of an apartment building, held there for fear of what would be done to them if they were found by the soldiers outside­ who were seething with rage, hatred and a violent impulse that one can scarcely understand, even now.