Music

Lowkey - Hand On Your Gun

WRITTEN BY STOP THE WAR ON 14 SEPTEMBER 2017. POSTED IN MUSIC AGAINST WAR Lyrics This one is dedicated to the suit-wearing arms dealers To the champagne-sipping depleted uranium droppers Keep your hand on your gun Don't you trust anyone Keep your hand on your gun Don't you trust anyone First in my scope is BAE Systems Specialize in killing people from a distance Power is a drug and they feed the addiction Immediate deletion of people's existence Who says what is and what isn't legitimate resistance To push the buttons you don't need a brave heart State of the art darts leave more than your face scarred You might impress an A&R with your fake bars Cause you probably think Rolls Royce only make cars This is for the colonizers turned bomb-providers Take this beef all the way back to Oppenheimer They call it warfare but your wars aren't fair If they were there'd be suicide bombers in Arms Fairs Scam for the funds, they will mangle your son If you try to speak out they will stamp on your tongue To your land they will come till you stand up as one It's begun [Hook] Next in my scope is Lockheed Martin They will tell you when the bombs need blastin' Don't think, just listen to the songs, keep dancin' Do they really want us to have our own brains Who do you think is really running Guantanamo Bay And it might be sensitive but I'll mention it Who do you think has got us filling out the censuses Who do you think is handing out the sentences This ain't the BBC so there's no censorship Heard of many mercenaries gettin' with the clever pimp Not a gun seller but none's better than Erik Prince Make money off many things, mainly it's crime This one is dedicated to the Raytheon 9 Scam for the funds, they will mangle your son If you try to speak out they will stamp on your tongue To your land they will come till you stand up as one It's begun http://www.
The Global Imaginary of Arab Hip Hop: A case study

The Global Imaginary of Arab Hip Hop: A case study

Stefania Taviano Im@go: A Journal of Social Imaginary, Volume 7, 2016 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7413/22818138066 Abstract Hip Hop is a complex cultural and musical phenomenon resulting from the interactions between globalization and localization processes. Hip Hop artists operating in different locations – and often moving between multiple localities – appropriate and (re)interpret the genre on the basis of local musical and cultural traditions while defining their identities as artists and more often than not as political activists.
Translating resistance in art activism

Translating resistance in art activism

Hip Hop and 100 Thousand Poets for Change DOI: 10.1080/14781700.2016.1190944 Stefania Taviano, Translation Studies, Volume 9, Issue 2, pages 282-297 Published online: 07 Jun 2016 ABSTRACT This article examines the role of translational and polylingual practices in global forms of art activism. It is through translation, both narrowly and broadly speaking, that local issues with a universal resonance overcome cultural and political borders and are addressed by art activists sharing common social and political strategies, such as Hiphoppas, and artists belonging to resistance movements, like the 100 Thousand Poets for Change (100TPC).
Then and now: The singer, the graffiti artists and the writer

Then and now: The singer, the graffiti artists and the writer

Photo by: Laura Gribbon. Alaa Awad's work on Mohamed Mahmoud Street Cultural producers who gained fame after the revolution Sunday, January 25, 2015 - 09:53 By: Rowan El Shimi; Laura Gribbon; Amany Ali Shawky We take a look at the trajectories of four cultural producers who gained fame during or after the January 25 revolution and find out what they're doing now.
UAE is opening its doors to rap music, says Syrian rapper

UAE is opening its doors to rap music, says Syrian rapper

Dhanusha Gokulan / 4 August 2014 Ahmad Molham Makki's style of rapping perhaps has the distinction of being poetic and something that has a strong social message. From the clothes he wears, to the chains he wears and the attitude he sports, Ahmad Molham Makki, aka Molham Rebel, is every inch a rapper. But unlike several rappers, who are all about making it big with the syncopated lyrics, Makki’s style of rapping perhaps has the distinction of being poetic and something that has a strong social message.
Thank you, Sinéad O’Connor, for boycotting Israel

Thank you, Sinéad O’Connor, for boycotting Israel

David Cronin on Fri, 07/25/2014 I vividly recall the first time I saw  live. She looked shy and fragile as she walked onstage. And then she began her song “Troy,” whispering to us one second; screaming at us the next. It was enchanting and haunting. That was 26 years ago. Ever since then, I’ve admired O’Connor as a woman of talent and courage. So I felt a bit hurt when she rejected me in a distinctly twenty-first century manner last month: by blocking me on Twitter.
Intra- and Interlingual Translation in Blackamerican Muslim Hip Hop

Intra- and Interlingual Translation in Blackamerican Muslim Hip Hop

Sara Hakeem Grewal From: African American Review Volume 46, Number 1, Spring 2013 pp. 37-54 | 10.1353/afa.2013.0023 Abstract: This article examines three main aspects of translation in the hip hop of Blackamerican Muslim hip-hop artists Mos Def and Lupe Fiasco: first, translation between Hip Hop Nation Language (HHNL) and a high register of White Mainstream English (WME) termed “academic English”; second, translation between HHNL and WME more broadly; and third, translation between HHNL and Arabic.