Human Rights

A lonely fight defending Egypt's jailed dissidents

A lonely fight defending Egypt's jailed dissidents

In this Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 photo, Egyptian lawyer Ragia Omran speaks on her mobile phone after a trial session of activists facing charges on organizing unauthorized protests, at a courtroom in Cairo, Egypt. Each time a group of activists is arrested in Egypt, the call for help goes most often to Omran. She then starts a long trek through police stations and prosecutors' offices, trying to get their release or at least some respect for their rights.
On Hunger Strike

On Hunger Strike

Omar Robert Hamilton London Review of Books Vol. 36 No 19 · 9 October 2014 page 30 | 1717 words After the shock and awe tactics of the Rabaa massacre last summer, when Egypt’s military regime murdered around a thousand supporters of the deposed president, Mohamed Morsi, the rolling counter-revolution has played out mostly within the justice system, between police stations, prisons and courtrooms. The system is self-contained and unaccountable: graduates of the Police Academy are automatically granted a law degree and can move fluidly from police station to prosecutor’s office to judge’s bench.
Drying Palestine: Israel’s Systemic Water War

Drying Palestine: Israel’s Systemic Water War

Al-Shabaka Policy Brief 4 September 2014 Overview The targeting of Palestinian water infrastructure is a systemic and two-pronged Israeli policy to prevent the existence of sustainable Palestinian communities. In this policy brief, Al-Shabaka Policy Member and environmental researcher Muna Dajani builds on the evidence of Israel’s targeting of water infrastructure and shows how the policy is not only preventing economic growth but is also driving Palestinians off their land. She looks at the resulting commodification of water and cautions that the process is changing traditional patterns of community water management and could forever change the shape of Palestinian society.
Egypt's Rabaa massacre: one year on

Egypt's Rabaa massacre: one year on

The killing of 817 protesters last August was this week judged a crime against humanity equal to, or worse, than Tiananmen Square. But feelings on the ground are mixed Destruction … the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, the morning after the massacre. Photograph: Ahmed Hayman/EPA Patrick Kingsley The Guardian, Saturday 16 August 2014 "To this day, I can't believe it happened. I reached a point where I couldn't talk to anyone. I couldn't talk to my family.
Breakfast with Mada: Mosaab Elshamy on Rabea, photography and memory

Breakfast with Mada: Mosaab Elshamy on Rabea, photography and memory

By: Lina Attalah Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 14:42 In her seminal work On Photography, Susan Sontag spoke of making photographs as an event in and of itself, which, simultaneously with the events they capture, work on creating “a tiny element of another world: the image world that bids to outlast us all.” Mosaab Elshamy, a photojournalist trained as a pharmacist, provided an indelible photographic document of the dispersal of the Rabea al-Adaweya sit-in on August 14, 2013.
The Exceptional Egyptian Human Rights Defender Yara Sallam

The Exceptional Egyptian Human Rights Defender Yara Sallam

Brian Dooley Become a fan Director, Human Rights First's Human Rights Defenders Program Posted: 08/14/2014 5:59 pm EDT Human rights defenders aren't always easy company. It's their job to be stubborn and sure of themselves, so they're often intense, sometimes abrasive. Yara Sallam is an exception. She's funny, engaging, and easygoing. And she's in jail in Cairo. She's been there since June 21, arrested on baseless charges with 22 other people after being in the vicinity of a peaceful protest march in Heliopolis.
The Air Was Hot with Hysterical Nationalism

The Air Was Hot with Hysterical Nationalism

August 14, 2014 A year after the Raba’a massacre in Cairo, one writer struggles to redraw her relationship to the city By Yasmin El-Rifae A year ago I woke up in Cairo to the news of a massacre, the second of the summer. I was subletting a friend’s apartment downtown, a beautiful place that gave me solitude above the blazing, dense insanity below while keeping me close to the small geography of my social life.
Ahmed Maher: What really happened to the Egyptian revolution

Ahmed Maher: What really happened to the Egyptian revolution

By Ahmed Maher June 4 2014 The Washington Post Ahmed Maher founded the April 6 Youth Movement that advocated democracy in Egypt and an end to the regime of Hosni Mubarak. He is in Egypt’s Tora prison. John Kerry’s widely quoted statement about Egypt’s Jan. 25, 2011, revolution — that it was sparked by the youth and “ stolen ” by the Muslim Brotherhood — is infuriating. Not because it’s not true but because it ignores the more recent fact that many of the young people who kindled the revolution are now jailed for defending democracy and human rights.
Ahmed Maher, Jailed Egyptian Activist, Describes Prison In Smuggled Letters

Ahmed Maher, Jailed Egyptian Activist, Describes Prison In Smuggled Letters

Shadee Ashtari Posted: 01/07/2014 5:04 pm EST Updated: 01/23/2014 10:53 am EST "It is forbidden to read or write, and entering a pen and paper to the political prisoners is more difficult than smuggling in drugs, and whoever is caught with a pen or paper is tortured along with all those with him," reads the Dec. 3 letter, smuggled out of Egypt’s notorious Tora Prison. "I met with some of the most famous and important figures of Europe, America, India, Korea and Turkey .