Graffiti

The Seven Wonders of the Revolution

The Seven Wonders of the Revolution

[A mural on Sheikh Rihan Street's wall. Image from the author.]By Soraya Morayef Jadaliyya, 22 May 2012 Around the corner from Tahrir Square, the heart of Egypt’s eighteen-day uprising, Mohamed Mahmud Street bears the scars of a turbulent political year in Egypt. The once-bustling street off of Tahrir Square has seen its share of violent battlefields--beginning with 28 January 2011 and ending with the February 2012 clashes following the Port Said massacre.
Update: Egypt confiscates revolution-time graffiti book for “instigating revolt”

Update: Egypt confiscates revolution-time graffiti book for “instigating revolt”

Egypt Independent Mohamed Mostafa Egypt's customs services in Alexandria have seized 400 copies of "Walls of Freedom", a book depicting Egypt's street graffitti art in the context of the 2011 uprising, for “instigating revolt,” says the Finance Ministry. Ahmed al-Sayyad, the ministry’s undersecretary, told Al-Masry Al-Youm that the book contains elements that give "advice on confronting police and army forces,” therefore a cause for concern.
Is Cairene Graffiti Losing Momentum?

Is Cairene Graffiti Losing Momentum?

[Late graffiti artist Hisham Rizq, killed in July 2014, painted by Ammar Abu Bakr. Captured 12 September 2014]By Mona Abaza, 25 January 2015 Clearly Cairene graffiti has lost momentum during this year. Having been the faithful barometer of the revolution over the past three years, graffiti has recently faced transmutations and drawbacks that run parallel with the political process of restoring “order” in the street. The heartbreaking story of the recent death of a cheerful and bright young graffiti artist, nineteen-year-old Hisham Rizq, completes this sad picture.
Then and now: The singer, the graffiti artists and the writer

Then and now: The singer, the graffiti artists and the writer

Photo by: Laura Gribbon. Alaa Awad's work on Mohamed Mahmoud Street Cultural producers who gained fame after the revolution Sunday, January 25, 2015 - 09:53 By: Rowan El Shimi; Laura Gribbon; Amany Ali Shawky We take a look at the trajectories of four cultural producers who gained fame during or after the January 25 revolution and find out what they're doing now.
Egypt’s Long History of Activist Artists

Egypt’s Long History of Activist Artists

Abdul Hadi El Gazzar’s - The Theatre of Life and Hunger (1952) (Courtesy of The AMCA Project's Pinterest Account) By: Sultan Al Qassemi 31 October 2014 Egyptian artists were deeply involved in spearheading, capturing, and influencing the January 2011 uprising. In fact, the artistic community lost one of its own when 32-year-old Ahmed Bassiouny died in the early days of the uprising while taking part in the protests. For four days, the contemporary digital artist and experimental musician documented the protests in videos, which were then posted online each evening.
Activism on the Move: Mediating Protest Space in Egypt with Mobile Technology

Activism on the Move: Mediating Protest Space in Egypt with Mobile Technology

Graffiti in Cairo depicting a television with the text "Go down to the streets" Sep 05 2014 The 2011 revolutionary uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa abruptly captured global attention as the world was drawn breathlessly into the tumult with a profusion of media content, from Tweets to amateur video footage. Amidst the media blitz, analyses yielded two conflated and reactionary narratives of events. One contended that the popular protests of the so-called “Arab Spring” were wholly unexpected, a shocking diversion from the familiar politics of the Middle East in a seeming contravention of the reigning global political apathy at the turn of the millennium.
Revolutionary Street Art: Complicating the Discourse

Revolutionary Street Art: Complicating the Discourse

[Image from Hossam El-Hamalawy] by Hannah Elansary Sept 01 2014 The graffiti and street art of revolutionary Egypt have been researched many times over by now.Journalists and scholars have explored the phenomenon in its many aspects—as evolving visual text, as political rhetoric and as an act of protest in its own right. The claims about the protest street art and graffiti that have proliferated across public Egyptian walls since 2011 have been many, and include: the spread of revolutionary graffiti in Egypt was a sign and act of citizens reclaiming public space from the regime; street art worked to raise awareness and build community and solidarity among people; street art served as a tool by which citizens could (re)claim agency, assert identity, and create their own historical narratives.
The Case of the Arabic Noirs

The Case of the Arabic Noirs

Pocket Novels: The Exile, J. Kessel, 1940. “A Novel of Human Untruths, about a Russian woman and her princesses, in exile, from the pen of the great French writer J. Kissel,” presumably the French novelist and journalist Joseph Kessel (1898-1979) August 20, 2014 | by Jonathan Guyer Cairo: the metal detector beeps. The security man wears a crisp white uniform. He nods and leans back in his chair. The lobby’s red oriental carpet, so worn it’s barely red, leads upstairs to the hotel tavern.
Egypt’s nascent street art movement under pressure

Egypt’s nascent street art movement under pressure

Street art from Mohamed Mahmoud Street, Cairo. (Photo: Melody Patry/Index on Censorship) Graffiti artists face threats of violence, and the potential of jail time and fines under a proposed draft law By Shahira Amin / 22 August, 2014 Before the January 2011 uprising, street art was little known in Egypt. Then came the revolution and with it, an outburst of creativity. With the fall of the authoritarian regime of Hosni Mubarak, Egyptian artists who had routinely faced censorship restrictions under his autocratic rule, felt a strong urge to break out of the confines of their studios and reclaim public spaces.
Another promise to be fulfilled

Another promise to be fulfilled

By Omar Robert Hamilton Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 01:14 The light is different in Zeinhom. The narrow street, arching trees and gentle slope of one of Cairo’s only hills combine to soften the bright, direct light that casts the city in her familiar monochrome. The light comes at you at an angle. Maybe it’s the hill. Or maybe it’s because I only go to Zeinhom early in the morning, to go to the city morgue.