Ethics

Ethics in the Translation and Interpreting Curriculum

Ethics in the Translation and Interpreting Curriculum

Surveying and Rethinking the Pedagogical Landscape Report commissioned by the Higher Education Academy © Mona Baker, 2013 Contents 1. Introduction 1.1. Accountability 1.2. Professional Engagement with Ethics 1.3 Political Conflict 1.4 Technological Advances 2. Ethics in Translator and Interpreter Education and Professional Codes of Practice 3. Incorporating Ethics in the Curriculum 3.1. Conceptual Tools 3.2 Ethics Themes in Translation and Interpreting 3.3 Strategies 3.4 Pedagogical tools 4. Case Study: Introducing Ethics into the Curriculum at Leeds and University of East Anglia 5.
Ethics of Renarration

Ethics of Renarration

Mona Baker is interviewed by Andrew Chesterman 2008. Cultus 1(1): 10-33. Click on the link below to download a copy of the interview. Baker Ethics of Renarration 2008 Opening question and answer quoted below. In lieu of an abstract. Chesterman: Your recent book Translation and Conflict. A Narrative Account (2006a) raises some interesting and important issues concerning the practice and ethics of translation and interpreting. You argue that translation is especially significant in conflict situations, and (like most human inventions, I suppose) can be used both for good and for ill.
The appropriation of the concept of intertextuality for translation-theoretic purposes

The appropriation of the concept of intertextuality for translation-theoretic purposes

DOI: 10.1080/14781700.2014.943677Panagiotis Sakellariou Published online: 27 Aug 2014, in Translation Studies, Taylor & Francis The present article offers a critical account of key applications of the concept of intertextuality for translation-theoretic purposes. It is argued that these applications form part of a reorientation in Western translation studies that involves a significant reconceptualization of both the practice of translation and the role of the translator. Seen from this perspective, the translation-theoretic appropriation of the concept of intertextuality presents itself as a particular moment of a reshaping process in the development of the discipline.
Call for Papers: Ideological Manipulation in Audiovisual Translation

Call for Papers: Ideological Manipulation in Audiovisual Translation

Special Issue of Altre Modernità – Rivista di studi letterarie e culturali Some of the most crucial developments in translation studies, in the last three decades, have taken place in the field of audiovisual translation (AVT) making it rapidly gravitate from the margins to the centre of academic endeavour in translation. The initial studies on AVT tended to focus on technical and linguistic issues, usually from a descriptive perspective, but more recently academic enquiry in this field has widened in scope by encompassing the socio-cultural and ideological dimensions.