Egyptian Revolution

The memory of the Egyptian revolution is the only weapon we have left

The memory of the Egyptian revolution is the only weapon we have left

Tens of thousands of Egyptians demonstrate in Cairo’s Tahrir Square in January 2011. Photograph: Misam Saleh/AFP/Getty Images Omar Robert Hamilton The Guardian, Monday 25 January 2016 I didn’t take my camera out with me the night Hosni Mubarak was overthrown. I stood in Tahrir Square among tens of thousands of Egyptians and told myself I would enjoy the moment, I would not divide myself from the night’s magical reality with a lens.
The future of the Egyptian revolution

The future of the Egyptian revolution

Egyptian pupils play at a school near Cairo Photograph: Hong Wu/Getty Images Egypt may today look like a tragic example of why mass protest is doomed, but the turmoil of the five years since Tahrir Square has unleashed a will for change and a resistance to power among ordinary citizens that could yet transform the country, and maybe the world Jack Shenker The Guardian, Saturday 16 January 2016  The video is shot from a balcony, and its style is familiar.
Translating the Egyptian Revolution

Translating the Egyptian Revolution

Activist use of translation to connect with global publics and protest movements Professor Mona Baker, University of Manchester This study examines one aspect of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution which has received no attention in public or academic circles so far, namely, the language-based practices that allow Egyptian protestors to contest dominant narratives of the Revolution and, importantly, to connect with, influence and learn from regional and global movements of protest, including the Tunisian uprising and the ‘Occupy’ movement.
The Prefigurative Politics of Volunteer Subtitling in the Egyptian Revolution

The Prefigurative Politics of Volunteer Subtitling in the Egyptian Revolution

Professor Martha Cheung Memorial Lecture, May 2014, Hong Kong Baptist University Mona Baker, Centre for Translation & Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester The idea of prefiguration originally derived from anarchist discourse; it involves experimenting with currently available means in such a way that they come to mirror or actualize the political ideals that inform a movement, thus collapsing the traditional distinction between means and ends. Practically all the literature on prefiguration has so far focused on structural, organizational and interactional issues.
Interview with Philip Rizk by Shuruq Harb

Interview with Philip Rizk by Shuruq Harb

Why Riot?, video by Mosireen Video Collect, 2013. “The revolution is not a thing of the past, the revolution is still in process.” Philip Rizk stated as we began our discussion of his text “2011 is not 1968”, whereby he challenges the dominant narratives of the January 25th Revolution as a youth lead revolution. He argues that the radicalizing factor of the uprising was an underclass without leaders.
Egypt—The Revolution Will Continue

Egypt—The Revolution Will Continue

Women's Media Centre, 20 January 2012 By Hoda Elsadda January 25 marks the anniversary of the onset of protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Here, Hoda Elsadda, an Egyptian women’s rights activist and professor at Cairo University, assesses women’s gains, potential losses and determination to move forward—as evidenced by last month’s 10,000-woman strong protest march. One year ago, the Egyptian people took to the streets demanding freedom, dignity and social justice. In 18 days full of sacrifice, solidarity and a touch of Egyptian humor, we succeeded in achieving what seemed to be impossible: the overthrow of the dictator, Mubarak.
Special Issue: Women, Culture, and the January 2011 Egyptian Revolution

Special Issue: Women, Culture, and the January 2011 Egyptian Revolution

Special Issue for Journal of Cultural Research Volume 19, Issue 2, 2015 Foreword Anastasia Valassopoulos pages 115-116 Acknowledgements page 117 Introduction: Egyptian women, revolution, and protest culture Dalia Said Mostafa pages 118-129 Action, imagination, institution, natality, revolution Ziad Elmarsafy pages 130-138 Egypt’s revolution, our revolution: revolutionary women and the transnational avant-garde Caroline Rooney pages 139-149 Inserting women’s rights in the Egyptian constitution: personal reflections Hala Kamal pages 150-161 Egyptian women, revolution and the making of a visual public sphere Fakhri Haghani pages 162-175 A multimodal analysis of selected Cairokee songs of the Egyptian revolution and their representation of women Nadia A.
Max Strasser on Once Upon a Revolution: An Egyptian Story

Max Strasser on Once Upon a Revolution: An Egyptian Story

When the Sun Falls over Tahrir 28 March 2015 SOMETIME IN THE SUMMER of 2011, I was sitting with a few friends at a café on the edge of a cliff overlooking Cairo. We were smoking shisha and drinking tea and beer, watching the sun set over the taupe tableau when we spotted two tall, blond men on the other side of the terrace with a digital camera, filming the sun’s descent through the smog.
End of the Leaderless Revolution

End of the Leaderless Revolution

Cihan Tuğal Berkeley Journal of Sociology 7 October 2014 When revolutionaries do not produce ideology, demands, and leaders, does this mean that the revolt will have no ideology, demands, and leaders? Cihan Tuğal discusses the limits and traps of Egypt’s “leaderless revolution” in light of the nation’s current military rule. In June 2013, millions of Egyptians mobilized against a clumsy autocrat, the elected dictator Morsi. The rallying cry was “a second revolution,” referring back to the toppling of Mubarak as the first one.