Culture

Picturing Egypt’s Next President

Picturing Egypt’s Next President

22 May 2014, The New Yorker By Jonathan Guyer Everybody knows who Egypt’s next President will be. Elections are scheduled for May 26th and 27th, almost a year after Mohamed Morsi was ousted in a coup led by the retired general Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, in what has been painted as a second revolution. With campaigning in overdrive, Sisi met with a delegation of artists on May 12th. According to local news reports, the candidate said that artists are “the heart and soul of the nation,” and its conscience.
Fiction and Colonial Identities: Arsène Lupin in Arabic

Fiction and Colonial Identities: Arsène Lupin in Arabic

Middle Eastern Literatures Volume 13, Issue 2, 2010, pages 191-210 Special Issue: Arabic Literature in Egypt at the Beginning of the 20th Century in Search of New Aesthetics: Al-Muwaylihi and Contemporaries DOI: 10.1080/1475262X.2010.487317Samah Selim Along with Ponson du Terrail's Rocambole and Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Maurice Leblanc's Arsène Lupin is one of the most famous popular fiction figures in the 20th century Egyptian literary imaginary. The first Arabic translation of Arsène Lupin, Gentleman-Cambrioleur (1907) by essayist and translator ‘Abd al-Qādir Hamza was published in the Egyptian fiction serial The People's Entertainments (Musāmarāt al-sha‘b, 1904-1911) in 1910.
11 Rules and 3 Award-winning Translations from Samah Selim

11 Rules and 3 Award-winning Translations from Samah Selim

BY MLYNXQUALEY on MARCH 8, 2012 • ( 2 ) The “10 rules” series resumes with award-winning translator Dr. Samah Selim. Eleven Rules 1. Think about register. Every essay, novel or story projects a particular and unique language register. A really important part of translating fiction is capturing and rendering that register in English. It’s easy to fall into the trap of overly stiff or archaic prose on the one hand and too-easy colloquialisms on the other.
Who do stories belong to?

Who do stories belong to?

Samah Selim re-maps the journey of the early Arab novel Friday, March 6, 2015 By Laura Gribbon, Jadaliyya Do stories need authors? Are texts fixed? Is adaptation a form of translation? These are some of the questions Professor Samah Selim has been considering in her study of Egyptian periodical Musamarat al-Shaab (The People’s Entertainment), and she raised them during a talk at the American University in Cairo last week.
A New Feminist Movement? Middle Eastern Hijabis as Superheroes

A New Feminist Movement? Middle Eastern Hijabis as Superheroes

Aquila By Women's Voices Now, Wednesday, 18th February 2015 In the late 1980s, feminism in the Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) context gained prominence in international debate. Research addressed “the status of women in Muslim countries through two frames: the inhibiting effects of Islam and the potential for reform through norms building.” Many contemporary scholars concluded, “Islam, specifically the prevailing interpretations of Islamic law (Shari’a),” the prevalent cultural traditions enshrined within this religion, and the attitudes it informs and fosters reinforce gender inequality in Muslim countries.
It's A Bird...It's A Plane...It's Qahera!

It's A Bird...It's A Plane...It's Qahera!

< The Daily Beast, KICKASS COMICS 09.22.13 Meet Egypt's newest comic superheroine: she wears a hijab, she has special powers, and she really, really doesn't like to be sexually harassed. On a fine Egyptian day, a woman who walks alone in the street is harassed by a man who has been following her. “Nice curves, gorgeous,” he says, before his hand reaches for her bottom. The woman turns around, and in shock, she screams “Stop him.
Don’t Mess with a Hijabi: An Interview with the Creator of “Qahera”

Don’t Mess with a Hijabi: An Interview with the Creator of “Qahera”

Muftah , September 23rd, 2013 In Muftah’s on-going podcast series, we speak with Deena Mohamed, the creator of Qahera, a hijabi super-heroine who combats Islamophobia and misogyny. Since publishing the first iteration of Qahera in June of 2013, Deena has received an overwhelmingly positive response to the comic strip, which is published in both English and Arabic. A look at some of the Qahera comic strips created so far makes clear that this hijabi superheroine is challenging perceptions about Islam, women, and the hijab, and breaking down cultural, social, and gender-based assumptions inside and outside the Middle East.
Egypt's new hijab-clad superheroine

Egypt's new hijab-clad superheroine

By Dina Demrdash, BBC Arabic, Cairo 8 December 2013 She's got comic strip superpowers, fights for justice and gives bad guys a hard time. If this makes you think of Catwoman, then think again - for this is a new kind of superheroine with a visible difference. Meet Qahera - the hijab-wearing Egyptian comic-book character fighting back against crime and prejudice. She is the brainchild of a young Egyptian artist who created the first ever Egyptian superhero in a web comic, and its picking up a growing fanbase.
‘Qahera’ Webcomic Creator Deena Mohamed Talks Superheroes, Gaza, and Women

‘Qahera’ Webcomic Creator Deena Mohamed Talks Superheroes, Gaza, and Women

July 29, 2014 Column » Comics & Dialogue: Islam in Graphic Novels by A. DAVID LEWIS for ISLAMiCommentary Deena Mohamed, a nineteen-year-old Egyptian graphic design student, does more than draw or doodle: She is creating a legend. Based partially on her own and her friends’ experiences within Egyptian culture, Mohamed chose to combat sexism and harassment with her hijab-clad superheroine Qahera, whose online webcomic inches closer daily to nearly one-million viewers.
Art Alert: El-Tarzi's Underground/On the Surface in cinemas for one week only

Art Alert: El-Tarzi's Underground/On the Surface in cinemas for one week only

Winner of the Muhr Arab Award for Best Director at the Dubai Intl Film Festival, Salma El-Tarzi’s feature documentary on unlikely music superstars, the 8%, will be shown in local cinemas 22-28 April 2015 Ahram Online , Sunday 19 Apr 2015 Salma El-Tarzi’s feature documentary on the world of Mahraganat (an emerging style of local music) follows some of the scene’s biggest stars, catching them at tipping point when their lives begin to transform as their fame explodes.