Bahia Shehab

A thousand times NO: Fellows Friday with Bahia Shehab

A thousand times NO: Fellows Friday with Bahia Shehab

Posted by: Karen Eng September 7, 2012 TED Blog When art historian and scholar of Arabic script Bahia Shehab was asked to create a piece commemorating the centenary of the first exhibition on Islamic art in Europe, little did she know that the Egyptian revolution would ultimately transform her into a street artist and activist with a powerful and subtle voice of protest. How did your work with the character for “no” begin?
Cairo as Canvas

Cairo as Canvas

By Bahia Shehab, Citysharing The streets of Cairo have become an open gallery to many artists wishing to express their views, dreams and hopes for a better Egypt. Artists are using the walls of the city to tell their stories, to lament the death of martyrs and to call for political and social change. Thus each painted wall acquires a life of its own, it no longer belongs to a building, a bridge or a street, but it has been recruited to serve a cause and to rally a group of people to support that cause.
Cairo as Canvas

Cairo as Canvas

By Bahia Shehab, Citysharing The streets of Cairo have become an open gallery to many artists wishing to express their views, dreams and hopes for a better Egypt. Artists are using the walls of the city to tell their stories, to lament the death of martyrs and to call for political and social change. Thus each painted wall acquires a life of its own, it no longer belongs to a building, a bridge or a street, but it has been recruited to serve a cause and to rally a group of people to support that cause.
Bahia Shehab: A thousand times no

Bahia Shehab: A thousand times no

[video poster="/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BahiaShehab_2012G-480p-mp4-image.png" width="854" height="480" mp4="/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BahiaShehab_2012G-480p.mp4"][/video] Filmed June 2012 Subtitles available in 36 languages Art historian Bahia Shehab has long been fascinated with the Arabic script for ‘no.’ When revolution swept through Egypt in 2011, she began spraying the image in the streets saying no to dictators, no to military rule and no to violence. Interactive transcriptInteractive transcript TED Fellow Bahia Shehab sends an important message through her street art in Cairo: “You can crush the flowers, but you can’t delay spring.
Bahia Shehab: A thousand times no

Bahia Shehab: A thousand times no

[video poster="/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BahiaShehab_2012G-480p-mp4-image.png" width="854" height="480" mp4="/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BahiaShehab_2012G-480p.mp4"][/video] Filmed June 2012 Subtitles available in 36 languages Art historian Bahia Shehab has long been fascinated with the Arabic script for ‘no.’ When revolution swept through Egypt in 2011, she began spraying the image in the streets saying no to dictators, no to military rule and no to violence. Interactive transcriptInteractive transcript TED Fellow Bahia Shehab sends an important message through her street art in Cairo: “You can crush the flowers, but you can’t delay spring.
NEFERTITI'S DAUGHTERS (Sneak Preview #1)

NEFERTITI'S DAUGHTERS (Sneak Preview #1)

Preview of Mark Nickolas documentary film Nefertiti's Daughters, featuring some of the most interesting street artists in Egypt. LOG LINE: Queen Nefertiti returns to join revolutionary street artists on the front lines in the fight for women’s rights and freedom in Egypt. SYNOPSIS: Nefertiti’s Daughters is a story of women, art and revolution. Told by prominent Egyptian artists, this documentary witnesses the critical role revolutionary street art played during the Egyptian uprisings.
NEFERTITI'S DAUGHTERS (Sneak Preview #1)

NEFERTITI'S DAUGHTERS (Sneak Preview #1)

Preview of Mark Nickolas documentary film Nefertiti's Daughters, featuring some of the most interesting street artists in Egypt. LOG LINE: Queen Nefertiti returns to join revolutionary street artists on the front lines in the fight for women’s rights and freedom in Egypt. SYNOPSIS: Nefertiti’s Daughters is a story of women, art and revolution. Told by prominent Egyptian artists, this documentary witnesses the critical role revolutionary street art played during the Egyptian uprisings.
Egypt’s nascent street art movement under pressure

Egypt’s nascent street art movement under pressure

Street art from Mohamed Mahmoud Street, Cairo. (Photo: Melody Patry/Index on Censorship) Graffiti artists face threats of violence, and the potential of jail time and fines under a proposed draft law By Shahira Amin / 22 August, 2014 Before the January 2011 uprising, street art was little known in Egypt. Then came the revolution and with it, an outburst of creativity. With the fall of the authoritarian regime of Hosni Mubarak, Egyptian artists who had routinely faced censorship restrictions under his autocratic rule, felt a strong urge to break out of the confines of their studios and reclaim public spaces.
Egypt’s nascent street art movement under pressure

Egypt’s nascent street art movement under pressure

Street art from Mohamed Mahmoud Street, Cairo. (Photo: Melody Patry/Index on Censorship) Graffiti artists face threats of violence, and the potential of jail time and fines under a proposed draft law By Shahira Amin / 22 August, 2014 Before the January 2011 uprising, street art was little known in Egypt. Then came the revolution and with it, an outburst of creativity. With the fall of the authoritarian regime of Hosni Mubarak, Egyptian artists who had routinely faced censorship restrictions under his autocratic rule, felt a strong urge to break out of the confines of their studios and reclaim public spaces.