Bahia Shehab

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project II

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project II

More Walls Painted In 2016 Bahia Shehab started an international street campaign celebrating the work of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. The first intervention was in Vancouver-Canada. In February she sprayed the stanza “Stand at the corner of a dream and fight” in downtown Vancouver. Street expression is no longer tolerated in Cairo. Shehab finds that the work of Darwish is more relevant today with the current political atmosphere in most of the Arab World.
Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project

Bahia Shehab's Mahmoud Darwish Project

In 2016 Bahia Shehab started an international street campaign celebrating the work of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. The first intervention was in Vancouver-Canada. In February she sprayed the stanza “Stand at the corner of a dream and fight” in downtown Vancouver. Street expression is no longer tolerated in Cairo. Shehab finds that the work of Darwish is more relevant today with the current political atmosphere in most of the Arab world.
Translating Emotions: Graffiti as a Tool for Change

Translating Emotions: Graffiti as a Tool for Change

Bahia Shehab During the Egyptian revolution, art sublimated violence and translated emotions. Music, theatre, video art, graffiti and cartoons were just a few examples of media of protest that overtook the streets and cyberspace. Strong emotions brought about intense creativity, and in the process artists and laymen alike provided us with exceptional examples of how to express dissidence and solidarity aesthetically. Focusing on graffiti, I engage with examples of collaborative creative protest and my own contribution to them, and treat the palimpsests that emerged out of the interaction among graffiti artists and between them and the public as a form of visual conversation.

Visual Identity

Published on May 21, 2013 Reviving calligraphy and shaping the future of script through her students, Bahia Shehab, Associate Professor of Practice in the Department of the Arts, works on the first ever encyclopedia of the Arabic script.

Visual Identity

Published on May 21, 2013 Reviving calligraphy and shaping the future of script through her students, Bahia Shehab, Associate Professor of Practice in the Department of the Arts, works on the first ever encyclopedia of the Arabic script.
Blue Bra Graffiti (Bahia Shehab)

Blue Bra Graffiti (Bahia Shehab)

No to Stripping BY Nama Khalil 2 September 2014, Design and Violence From the curators: Using sexual violence to intimidate, crack down on dissent, or brutalize opposition is nothing new. Neither is graffiti—illicit drawings are older than Pompeii. However, such designs have taken on new life of late, paralleling an increased public and political focus on female sexuality. During the wave of disparate yet interconnected protests that made up the Arab Spring (2010–ongoing), graffiti emerged as an untamable form of grassroots resistance to such violence.
Blue Bra Graffiti (Bahia Shehab)

Blue Bra Graffiti (Bahia Shehab)

No to Stripping BY Nama Khalil 2 September 2014, Design and Violence From the curators: Using sexual violence to intimidate, crack down on dissent, or brutalize opposition is nothing new. Neither is graffiti—illicit drawings are older than Pompeii. However, such designs have taken on new life of late, paralleling an increased public and political focus on female sexuality. During the wave of disparate yet interconnected protests that made up the Arab Spring (2010–ongoing), graffiti emerged as an untamable form of grassroots resistance to such violence.

Bahia Shehab: Art As a Tool for Change

https://vimeo.com/89910610 24 March 2014, Louisiana Channel "Graffiti is like flowers. They are beautiful, but they don't live long." An interview with Lebanese-Egyptian street-artist Bahia Shehab about the role of art during the Arab spring: "You cannot resist ideas. They can travel into any mind." "I am a quiet person, I don't know how to scream", says Bahia Shehab. "My contribution to the revolution was to paint on the walls, was to be an artist.

Bahia Shehab: Art As a Tool for Change

https://vimeo.com/89910610 24 March 2014, Louisiana Channel "Graffiti is like flowers. They are beautiful, but they don't live long." An interview with Lebanese-Egyptian street-artist Bahia Shehab about the role of art during the Arab spring: "You cannot resist ideas. They can travel into any mind." "I am a quiet person, I don't know how to scream", says Bahia Shehab. "My contribution to the revolution was to paint on the walls, was to be an artist.
A thousand times NO: Fellows Friday with Bahia Shehab

A thousand times NO: Fellows Friday with Bahia Shehab

Posted by: Karen Eng September 7, 2012 TED Blog When art historian and scholar of Arabic script Bahia Shehab was asked to create a piece commemorating the centenary of the first exhibition on Islamic art in Europe, little did she know that the Egyptian revolution would ultimately transform her into a street artist and activist with a powerful and subtle voice of protest. How did your work with the character for “no” begin?