Arabic

Beyond Fault Lines: Translating "the Gulf" - March 23rd - 24th 2015

Beyond Fault Lines: Translating "the Gulf" - March 23rd - 24th 2015

Location: Qatar National Convention Center, Doha, Qatar Deadline for proposals: October 30th, 2014 Conference dates: March 23rd – 24th, 2015 Conference is organized by: Translation and Interpreting Institute (TII) “Beyond Fault Lines: Translating ‘the Gulf’” is the sixth in a series of annual international conferences that aim to create a Gulf-based platform for discussing issues related to translation. It will be held from March 23 to March 24, 2015 at Qatar National Convention Center (QNCC), Qatar.
Juggling a cacophony of tongues, UN interpreters avert linguistic disaster

Juggling a cacophony of tongues, UN interpreters avert linguistic disaster

Highly skilled interpreters perform a vital service at UN meetings, where delegates come together to present their views in one of the six official languages or in their own tongue. A UN Interpreter, at work in a booth over looking a meeting room. (1965) UN Photo Feature: UN News Centre 22 September 2014 Out of potential linguistic chaos, a corps of over 100 United Nations interpreters brings order and comprehension as speaker after speaker from around the world takes the podium of the General Assembly to give their annual speeches at the General Debate, discusses war and peace in the Security Council, or delves into arcane details of administrative and budgetary affairs in one of the Assembly’s six specialized committees.
Activism on the Move: Mediating Protest Space in Egypt with Mobile Technology

Activism on the Move: Mediating Protest Space in Egypt with Mobile Technology

Graffiti in Cairo depicting a television with the text "Go down to the streets" Sep 05 2014 The 2011 revolutionary uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa abruptly captured global attention as the world was drawn breathlessly into the tumult with a profusion of media content, from Tweets to amateur video footage. Amidst the media blitz, analyses yielded two conflated and reactionary narratives of events. One contended that the popular protests of the so-called “Arab Spring” were wholly unexpected, a shocking diversion from the familiar politics of the Middle East in a seeming contravention of the reigning global political apathy at the turn of the millennium.
U-M Arabic poetry translator wins 'genius' grant

U-M Arabic poetry translator wins 'genius' grant

Photo: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation) By Katrease Stafford, Detroit Free Press Staff Writer 17 September 2014 The 2014 MacArthur Fellows — so-called genius grants — were announced Wednesday morning. One University of Michigan professor is joining a rare class of creative individuals today: Khaled Mattawa is among 21 people from around the country named as 2014 MacArthur Foundation Fellows. In the academic world, the award is known as the "
The World Bank Translation Style Guide: Arabic Edition

The World Bank Translation Style Guide: Arabic Edition

© 2004 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank Translation Services Translation_Style_Guide_Arabic Also available at: http://siteresources.worldbank.org/TRANSLATIONSERVICESEXT/Resources/Translation_Style_Guide_Arabic.pdf?__scoop_post=
Temporary Center for Translation

Temporary Center for Translation

The Temporary Center for Translation is a site for pedagogical exchange founded on the importance of translation as a mode for thinking, making, and doing. Every translation sets into play distinct vocabularies and systems of meaning—linguistic and otherwise—and it is in these encounters that priorities and positions are negotiated. While fidelity to an original work or idea is paramount in some theories of translation, the Center questions what exactly constitutes a likeness.
The Poet Cannot Stand Aside: Arabic Literature and Exile

The Poet Cannot Stand Aside: Arabic Literature and Exile

M. Lynx Qualey Fourteen hundred years ago and more, the poet-prince Imru’ al-Qais was banished by his father. The king exiled his son, or so the legend goes, in part because of the prince’s poetry. Thus it was that, when the king was killed by a group of his subjects, al-Qais was traveling with friends. Al-Qais returned to avenge his father’s death, but afterward spent the rest of his life in exile, fleeing from place to place, writing poetry and seeking support to regain his father’s throne.
The Case of the Arabic Noirs

The Case of the Arabic Noirs

Pocket Novels: The Exile, J. Kessel, 1940. “A Novel of Human Untruths, about a Russian woman and her princesses, in exile, from the pen of the great French writer J. Kissel,” presumably the French novelist and journalist Joseph Kessel (1898-1979) August 20, 2014 | by Jonathan Guyer Cairo: the metal detector beeps. The security man wears a crisp white uniform. He nods and leans back in his chair. The lobby’s red oriental carpet, so worn it’s barely red, leads upstairs to the hotel tavern.